Polarity
• Alkanes are not polar, as there is no electronegativity between C-H bonds
• Alcohols and water are polar because they contain –OH bonds, with a difference in electronegativity
• The only force present in hydrocarbons are Van Der Waals
Reactivity
• Alkenes are more reactive than alkanes due to their double bonds which break in the reaction releasing more energy
• Alkanes are not reactive but can be combusted as fuels for engines.
Solubility
• Alkanes are non-polar and therefore do not mix and dissolve into polar liquids such as water. They are unable to form hydrogen bonds between each molecule. Water also has strong hydrogen bonds between each H2O molecule and therefore not want to move apart to allow for the alkane in
Boiling Points
• The increase in the chain of the atoms in an alkane, increases the boiling points as a result of there being more Van der Waal forces between each molecule. (A CH4 molecule has a boiling point of -161.5 °C, where are C10H22

Polarity
• Alkanes are not polar, as there is no electronegativity between C-H bonds
• Alcohols and water are polar because they contain –OH bonds, with a difference in electronegativity
• The only force present in hydrocarbons are Van Der Waals

Reactivity
• Alkenes are more reactive than alkanes due to their double bonds which break in the reaction releasing more energy
• Alkanes are not reactive but can be combusted as fuels for engines.

Solubility
• Alkanes are non-polar and therefore do not mix and dissolve into polar liquids such as water. They are unable to form hydrogen bonds between each molecule. Water also has strong hydrogen bonds between each H2O molecule and therefore not want to move apart to allow for the alkane in

Boiling Points
• The increase in the chain of the atoms in an alkane, increases the boiling points as a result of there being more Van der Waal forces between each molecule.

Polarity
• Alkanes are not polar, as there is no electronegativity between C-H bonds
• Alcohols and water are polar because they contain –OH bonds, with a difference in electronegativity
• The only force present in hydrocarbons are Van Der Waals

Reactivity
• Alkenes are more reactive than alkanes due to their double bonds which break in the reaction releasing more energy
• Alkanes are not reactive but can be combusted as fuels for engines.

Solubility
• Alkanes are non-polar and therefore do not mix and dissolve into polar liquids such as water. They are unable to form hydrogen bonds between each molecule. Water also has strong hydrogen bonds between each H2O molecule and therefore not want to move apart to allow for the alkane in

Name of Alkene

Number of Carbons

Chemical Formula

Boiling Point in °C
(degrees centigrade)

State at “Room Temperature” (20°C)

Melting Point in °C
(degrees centigrade)

Ethene

2

C2H4

-104

gas

-169

Propene

3

C3H6

-47

gas

-185

Z-Butene

4

C4H8

0.9

gas

-138.9

E-Butene

4

C4H8

3.7

gas

-139.7

1-Pentene

5

C5H10

30

gas

-165

Z-2-Pentene

5

C5H10

36

gas

-135

E-2-Pentene

5

C5H10

37

gas

-180

1-hexene

6

C6H12

63

liquid

−139.8

1-Heptene

7

CH14

115

liquid

-119

3-octene

8

C8H16

122

liquid

-101.9

3-nonene

9

C9H18

147

liquid

-84.4

5-decene

10

C10H20­

170

liquid

-66.3

 

Name of Alkane

Number of Carbons

Chemical Formula

Boiling Point in °C
(degrees centigrade)

State at “Room Temperature” (20°C)

Melting Point in °C
(degrees centigrade)

Methane

1

C H4

-162

gas

-183

Ethane

2

C2H6

-89

gas

-172

Propane

3

C3H8

-42

gas

-188

Butane

4

C4H10

0

gas

-138

Pentane

5

C5H12

36

liquid

-130

Hexane

6

C6H14

69

liquid

-95

Heptane

7

C7H16

98

liquid

-91

Octane

8

C8H18

126

liquid

-57

Nonane

9

C9H20

151

liquid

-54

Decane

10

C10H22

174

liquid

-30